Accordion


San Antonio’s The Krayolas — known to their screaming fans as THE TEX-MEX BEATLES — crank up the accordion, tuba, and more cowbell for the ranchera-style Piñata Trump. Santiago Jimenez Jr. (Flaco Jimenez’s younger brother) guest stars on button accordion. [Mas…]

flacory“Put your sweet lips a little closer to the phone,” Ry Cooder sings. “Let’s pretend that we’re together all alone. I’ll tell the man to turn the juke box way down low. And you can tell your friend there with you HE’LL HAVE TO GO.” And then Flaco Jimenez plays. [Mas…]


Ry Cooder on guitar and vocals and Flaco Jimenez on norteño-style accordion make magic with the Ben E. King classic oldie but goodie Stand By Me.

PREVIOUSLY ON FLACO JIMENEZ: [Mas…]

bigflacoHappy 76th birthday, Texas accordian star Flaco Jimenez! Why is Mexican music filled with polkas and waltzes and accordions? It’s about immigration, according to Felix Contreras of NPR’s Alt.Latino and Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie Records on Morning Edition:

 

PREVIOUSLY ON FLACO JIMENEZ: [Mas…]

For generations, Americans have revered The Star-Spangled Banner as their National Anthem, singing it at baseball games, karaoke nights and Fourth of July celebrations around the country.

It may come as a surprise, however, that the song’s author, Francis Scott Key, was actually a Mexican immigrant named Francisco Scott Quiñones and that the song was written to his friend and fellow immigrant Jose Canusi after witnessing the storied defense of Ft. McHenry on Sept. 16, 1814.

According to records in the National Archives, the original manuscript (image, below)  begins with the words: “Jose, can you see by the dawn’s early light?”

Long a source of pride in the Mexican-American community, the subject of Francis Scott Key’s true identity is taboo in academia and historical re-enactment circles.

“The National Anthem’s Mexican roots are America’s best-kept secret,” says UCLA Musicologist T. Gray Del Norte. ”And it makes perfect sense if you consider that the Statue of Liberty is French and the U.S. Constitution is based on the Iroquois Confederacy.” [Mas…]


The wetback drove from Laredo to San Antonio to see his girl — and that’s when the trouble started.

The Mavericks rock Austin City Limits: ‘Come Unto Me’ (video)

by I. RHEE March 14, 2013 Cultura
Thumbnail image for The Mavericks rock Austin City Limits: ‘Come Unto Me’ (video)

The twangy surf sound of twin vintage Fender Jazzmaster guitars, R&B-meets-mariachi horn section, Tex-Mex accordion, a trumpet solo (!) and great vocals by Raul Malo make for a stellar performance by The Mavericks on Austin City Limits. New record, new tour! Gracias a Latin Alternative for the heads up.

[Mas…]

Proud Star-Spangled Beaners: Francisco Scott Quiñones, Jose Canusi

by Victor Payan July 4, 2012 Cultura
Thumbnail image for Proud Star-Spangled Beaners: Francisco Scott Quiñones, Jose Canusi

For generations, Americans have revered The Star-Spangled Banner as their National Anthem, singing it at baseball games, karaoke nights and Fourth of July celebrations around the country. It may come as a surprise, however, that the song’s author, Francis Scott Key, was actually a Mexican immigrant named Francisco Scott Quiñones and that the song was […]

[Mas…]