spelling

They may not be the heroes that Ecuador needs or deserves but they sure do get pissed off when you don’t know where a comma goes.

Since January, vigilantes in Quito, Ecuador have been correcting mistakes in the city’s graffiti.

These guerillas use stencils cut from pizza boxes to add commas, question marks and, ah yes, even accent marks to imperfect street art around town.

The members of Acción Ortográfica Quito take their pseudonyms (or superhero names) from punctuation marks: Diéresis, Tilde and Coma.

Diéresis, a 30-year-old lawyer/vigilante, told The Guardian in an interview, “Grammatical errors cause stress. We only make texts comprehensible that otherwise would not send any message whatsoever.” [Mas…]

libetyortrannyfinal

Where do you want to go to eat?

carne-assface [Mas…]


Subcommandanta del Ñews Sara Inés Calderón has a one-minute Spanish lesson for you pochos. She’s on Twitter as @SaraChicaD.

(PNS reporting from WASHINGTON D.C.) The board of the historic student organization MEChA voted Wednesday to change the group’s name to something easier for its members to pronounce.

MEChA was born during the Chicano Civil Rights Movement, and its name — Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán — was an artifact of its 1960s’ genesis. But Xicano activism waned in the ensuing decades; every year since 1968, for example, the number of baby girls named Xochitl has declined.

Members are no longer interested in getting back to their Nahuatl roots and Los Angeles local chapter male co-chair David Hernandez told PNS that there’s no need. “I mean, I already am from Aztlán, Whittier, you know? And we don’t speak Spanish here,” he said. [Mas…]