New Mexico petroglyphs: Headlines from the past (photos)

croppedpetro6There’s lots to see in Placitas, a small New Mexico community north of Albuquerque between the Sandia and Santa Ana Pueblos. If you take a stroll through the foothills, chances are you’ll spot ancient petroglyphs amid the hoof prints of wild horses.

And that’s what I found on a jog Sunday near my home.

On top of a hill I spotted petroglyphs of animals, insects, and other images lost to history. They were most likely created by the indigenous people of the region hundreds of years ago. Hopi journalist Patty Talahongva says they are headlines from the past.

Next to them, unfortunately, were a few scratches (defacing) likely made by area residents in recent years.

Mas…New Mexico petroglyphs: Headlines from the past (photos)

America’s favorite crying NDN? An Italian-American from Louisiana

cryingindianAmerica’s favorite (crying) Indian actor, Iron Eyes Cody, was actually born Espera Oscar de Corti in rural Louisiana in 1904. His parents, Antonio de Corti and Francesca Salpietra, had emigrated from Sicily just a few years before.

After his non-Native history was revealed late in his career, Iron Eyes Cody refused to admit the truth and continued to wear his braided wig, headdress, and moccasins, and never stopped his support of Native Americans.

Mas…America’s favorite crying NDN? An Italian-American from Louisiana

POCHO History 101: The invasion – how America ‘grew’ (video)


Via EHistory.org:

Between 1776 and 1887, the United States seized over 1.5 billion acres from America’s indigenous people by treaty and executive order. The Invasion of America shows how by mapping every treaty and executive order during that period. It concludes with a map of present-day Federal Indian reservations.

PREVIOUSLY ON NATIVE AMERICANS:

Mas…POCHO History 101: The invasion – how America ‘grew’ (video)

Cutest historical Native American baby pics evah! (photos)

navajocroppedPaul and Petra Ratner made a film called Moses on the Mesa, which tells the true story of Solomon Bibo, the Jewish governor of the Native American tribe of Acoma in the days of the Wild West. And along the way (part of their quest for historical accuracy) they assembled a treasure trove of period photos of Indians, which they share on Facebook.

[Editor’s Parenthetical Thing] We are not like THOSE OTHER SITES WHO RUN SHAMEFUL IMAGES SCRAPED FROM INSTAGRAM OF CATS WRAPPED IN BLANKETS. CAN YOU IMAGINE?!   PEOPLE CALL THESE TORTURED, CONFINED KITTIES PURRITOS!!!

[And the two preceding paragraphs have led up to this] Instead, POCHO chooses to run a few specific pictures we found on the Moses page — stunning portraits of Indian babies in Indian baby carriers. Very Indian. Many papooses. Such cuteness. Wow.

[Additional Geeky Editor’s Note] Technically, “papoose” means baby, not the baby board. What you call a papoose IN a baby carrier is another issue altogether. 😉 

Mas…Cutest historical Native American baby pics evah! (photos)

Heidi Klum to Natives: ‘You’re offended? Boy, is my face red!’ (photos)

redfaceklumWe don’t publish the deets of people who visit POCHO.COM or subscribe to our newsletter but we can assure you that Heidi Klum is neither a visitor nor a subscriber, although she’d be smart to remedy that personal failing ASAP. If she were a regular POCHO-naut, she’d never have consented to the red-face photo shoot for Germany’s Next Top Model.

Klum (photo, above) donned her red-face garb along with the other contestants, and published their photos on her Facebook page:

Mas…Heidi Klum to Natives: ‘You’re offended? Boy, is my face red!’ (photos)

Am I a prophet? A time-traveling cartoonist? (toon, photo)

twotoons

One of my preferred topics for editorial cartoons has always been American mistreatment of indigenous people. Nothing makes me feel better than dreaming up a solid cartoon that reminds us all about the sordid history of our country’s crimes against Indians. The only thing more satisfying is seeing my ideas validated.

This week a dude sent me a “heads-up” about a Tweet featuring one of these editorial cartoons. I clicked the link and just about fell out of my chair.

The graphic in the Tweet was a side-by-side presentation of my cartoon showing a Native American confronting an Indian-mascot-garbed sports fan next to a photograph of a Native American confronting an Indian-mascot-garbed sports fan (image, above.)

Mas…Am I a prophet? A time-traveling cartoonist? (toon, photo)

Mexican Football League fans: ‘WTF is the big deal about team names?’

mfl(PNS reporting from TIJUANA) While the American sports industrial complex is still debating the insensitive and racist Native American mascot of the Washington Redskins, fans and players of the Mexican Football League (MFL) openly question the sensitivity of some in U.S. sports circles.

Tijuana resident and avid MFL fan Nestor Gil de Vaca is puzzled.

“What is the problem with the gringos?” he asked PNS. “Sports team mascots are just that, mascots. It’s not like they are real people. I am a huge fan of the Monterrey Judios, the Sonora Cadaveres and of course my home team, the Tijuana Travestis. No one is offended, we just like to enjoy football.”

Mas…Mexican Football League fans: ‘WTF is the big deal about team names?’

Breaking: ‘Devious Maids’ producer preps ‘Desperate Tontos’

bigtonto(PNS reporting from HOLLYWOOD) Television producer Marc Cherry is developing a new series called Desperate Tontos, which is about four white actors donning even whiter makeup to play Native Americans. The series is seen as a comeback attempt following Cherry’s floundering Devious Maids series, which was a disastrous attempt to portray Latinas.

Cherry admits Maids took him a little out of his comfort zone as a writer. “I’m a white guy, and I should write what I know,” said Cherry. “And what I know is how to be a white man pimping other people’s cultures.”

Mas…Breaking: ‘Devious Maids’ producer preps ‘Desperate Tontos’

Coming soon to a theater near them: Navajo ‘Star Wars’ (NPR audio)

If you find yourself in the Navajo Nation (in Arizona) on July 3, you’re in the right place at the right time for a once-in-a-lifetime experience — the premiere of Star Wars, translated into Navajo.

NPR reports:

The 1977 classic has been translated into many languages, and the latest effort is the brainchild of Manuelito Wheeler, director of the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, Ariz.

“We needed a way to preserve our culture,” Wheeler tells NPR’s Robert Siegel. “Language is at the core of a culture. And I felt we needed a more contemporary way to reach not just young people but the population in general. And so, that’s when the idea of translating a major movie into the Navajo language came up.”

Here’s the NPR interview: