54 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters


Fifty-four years go – 1965 – big hair and girl groups were what all the cool kids dug in East Los Angeles.

Sisters Rosella, Ersi, and Mary Arvizu believed they could be the next Supremes — even before there were Supremes. They called themselves The Sisters.

Mark Guerrero, son of Chicano music legend Lalo Guerrero, tells the story:

Mas…54 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters

53 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters


Fifty-three years go – 1965 – big hair and girl groups were what all the cool kids dug in East Los Angeles.

Sisters Rosella, Ersi, and Mary Arvizu believed they could be the next Supremes — even before there were Supremes. They called themselves The Sisters.

Mark Guerrero, son of Chicano music legend Lalo Guerrero, tells the story:

Mas…53 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters

51 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters


Fifty-one years go – 1965 – big hair and girl groups were what all the cool kids dug in East Los Angeles.

Sisters Rosella, Ersi, and Mary Arvizu believed they could be the next Supremes — even before there were Supremes. They called themselves The Sisters.

Mark Guerrero, son of Chicano music legend Lalo Guerrero, tells the story:

Mas…51 Years Ago in East Los: ‘Happy New Year Baby’ from The Sisters

Watch: The Sisters wish you a ‘Happy New Year, Baby’ (Firme Oldie)


It’s 1965 and big hair and girl groups are all the rage.

In East LA, sisters Rosella, Ersi and Mary Arvizu, who had been singing and playing music together all their lives, thought they had the right stuff to be the next Supremes — even before there were Supremes. They call themselves The Sisters.

Mas…Watch: The Sisters wish you a ‘Happy New Year, Baby’ (Firme Oldie)

Why Goth Latinos love Morrissey and other stories (audio, video)

mozlive300
NPR’s LatinoUSA (with Maria Hinojosa) writes:

Goth culture. Is it in? Is it out? Do they even care? Hear the stories of three Latinos who found a sense of community in Goth subculture while we try to answer the question of the ages: Why are Latinos obsessed with Morrissey? It’s not just the Pompadour.

Here’s a video of Moz live at Staples Center in Los Angeles in March with the classic Smiths’ song The Boy With The Thorn in His Side. The audience knows all the words and sings along!

Mas…Why Goth Latinos love Morrissey and other stories (audio, video)

Ring In the Oldies: ‘Happy New Year Baby,’ ‘Sabor A Mi’ (music videos)


It’s 1965 and big hair and girl groups are all the rage.

In East L.A., sisters Rosella, Ersi and Mary Arvizu, who had been singing and playing music together all their lives, thought they had the right stuff to be the next Supremes — even before there were Supremes. They called themselves The Sisters.

Mas…Ring In the Oldies: ‘Happy New Year Baby,’ ‘Sabor A Mi’ (music videos)

Espace age bachelor Esquivel’s ‘Mucha Muchacha’ (music video)


Tap your tootsies, snap your fingers and enjoy a cerveza with one of espace age bachelor pad musical maestro Juan Garcia Esquivel’s greatest hits: Mucha Muchacha. And whistle. You know how to whistle, don’t you?

Wikipedia:

Juan García Esquivel (January 20, 1918 – January 3, 2002) often simply known as Esquivel!, was a Mexican band leader, pianist, and composer for television and films. He is recognized today as one of the foremost exponents of a sophisticated style of largely instrumental music that combines elements of lounge music and jazz with Latin flavors. Esquivel is sometimes called “The King of Space Age Pop” and “The Busby Berkeley of Cocktail Music.” Esquivel is considered one of the foremost exponents of a style of late 1950s-early 1960s quirky instrumental pop that became known (in retrospect) as “Space Age Bachelor Pad Music”.