Running POCHO is a dirty job but some juan’s gotta do it

pochoonlineRunning POCHO is a real job. It takes hours of work, dedication and writers, editors, artists and videographers.

And it takes time and money.

We’ve got the time. We need you for the money.

  • We’d like more Internet bandwidth which means we need more money for our hosting company.
  • We’d like to rebuild this website, which means we need to hire a web development company.
  • And we’d like to pay the volunteer editors, cartoonists, reporters, and photographers who contribute because they believe in the mission.

Mas…Running POCHO is a dirty job but some juan’s gotta do it

Pocha Yari Rodriguez wants to live (and die?) on Mars (video)

marspochaCalifornia-born Yari Rodriguez wants to be a crew member on that one-way trip to Mars – but she’s scared.

For Smith College engineering grad Rodriguez, the most terrifying thing about a one-way trip to Mars isn’t a rocket malfunction, lack of oxygen, or the probability of death on Mars, she told Fox News Latino. It’s the cameras.

“It’s the scariest part about the whole mission,” Rodriguez, 27, said. “I’m really shy and nervous…I’ve been coming to terms with being on TV.”

Mas…Pocha Yari Rodriguez wants to live (and die?) on Mars (video)

Black & white history: Juvenile delinquents ‘Ask Me, Don’t Tell Me’


Ask Me, Don’t Tell Me (1961, 22 mins.) Adult suspicion, pompadours, cigarettes, chromed cars, pool halls, the jitterbug and pinball machines conspire to turn kids into juvenile delinquents, but earnest do-gooders can save the day! Great rock ‘n’ roll soundtrack and candid footage make late 1950s early 1960s gang life look sweet — in the days before guns and drive-bys.

The camera follows the day-to-day lives of San Francisco teenage gang members (AKA “jacket clubs”) — white, Asian, Mexican, black — and the unfriendly world they inhabit. The documentary was produced by the American Friends Service Committee, which wanted to set the kids on the right path with community service projects.